Scottish Archaeology Month at Holyrood Park

Meet a druid and discover the secrets of Iron Age life at Holyrood Park

If you have ever wondered how our Iron Age ancestors flourished, an Historic Scotland event this weekend could answer your questions with an appearance from a druid, firestarter, a medical herbalist, and other characters well versed in survival techniques.

 

This popular annual free event, on Sunday (September 9th) is based at the agency’s Education Centre in Holyrood Park, where visitors of all ages will be able to enjoy talks, walks, demonstrations and “try your hand at” workshops.

 

“Archaeology Day” is the first of four Historic Scotland Ranger events planned for September, to help celebrate Scottish Archaeology Month – all of them free.

 

 

students from Abbeyhill School taking part in a series of activities organised by Historic Scotland's Holyrood Park Education Centre

Students from Abbeyhill School taking part in a series of activities organised by Historic Scotland's Holyrood Park Education Centre

 

Historic Scotland Ranger, Katy Firth commented: “Archaeology Day on Sunday launches a fascinating programme of events bringing the history of Holyrood Park to life.

 

“On subsequent Sundays throughout the month we will be offering a series of guided walks, revealing how our ancestors survived here, from hunter-gatherers and Celts through mediaeval times to the modern era.”

 

The walks, which will reveal the archaeological secrets around the Park, are graded as strenuous and visitors are recommended to bring warm, waterproof clothing, and sturdy footwear with good grips. It is also suggested that a snack and drink are taken on the walks.

 

● “Archaeology Day” on Sunday, September 9th is based at Holyrood Park Education Centre, between 11am and 3pm. The event, suitable for all the family, includes short guided walks over amenity grassland. Parking is at Broad Pavement Car Park – access via Holyrood Road or Scottish Parliament entrances only. All indoor activities are suitable for disabled visitors.

 

● “Surviving Eidyn” (Sunday, September 16th), focusing on the Park’s prehistoric hunter-gatherers, is a three-hour walk which may not be suitable for those aged under 16 years. It runs from 9am till noon. Parking is at Duddingston car park – access via Duddingston entrance only. The event may not be suitable for visitors with mobility issues, for whom guided walks can be arranged.

 

● “Celtic Crag” (Sunday, September 23rd) is a three-hour walk revealing how Celtic people lived in the Park 2,000 years ago. Running from 9am till noon, this event may also be unsuitable for those aged under 16 years, or the disabled. Parking is at the Broad Pavement car park – access via Holyrood Road or Scottish Parliament entrances only. Guided walks for visitors with mobility issues can be arranged.

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● “Active Archaeology” (Sunday, September 30th), also from 9am till noon, explores the Park’s mediaeval and modern archaeology – find out how life has changed at Holyrood over the past 1,000 years. It may not be suitable for those aged under 16 years, or the disabled. Parking is at Broad Pavement car park – access via Holyrood Road or Scottish Parliament entrances only. Guided walks for visitors with mobility issues can be arranged.

 

For further information on all the events, and to book a place, please phone the Historic Scotland Ranger Service on 0131 652 8150.

 

 

 

Feature photo: Costumed performers such as this Roman soldier at last year’s Archaeology Day will be entertaining adults and children at this Sunday’s event in Holyrood Park.
 

 

Historic Scotland is an executive agency of the Scottish Government charged with ensuring that our historic environment provides a strong foundation for a successful future for Scotland. The agency is fully accountable to Scottish Ministers and through them to the Scottish Parliament. For more information visit www.historic-scotland.gov.uk

All information and photos contained herein provided by Historic Scotland

 

 

 

Author: 
Jessie Voigts
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Jessie Voigts